MY TURN – SOUTH AFRICA

SHOOT THE BOER – KILL THE FARMER

APPROVED & ENDORSED BY JUDGE EDWIN MOLAHLEHI – EQUALITY COURT SOUTH AFRICA

“𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝗼𝗻𝗴 𝗱𝗼𝗲𝘀 𝗻𝗼𝘁 𝗰𝗼𝗻𝘀𝘁𝗶𝘁𝘂𝘁𝗲 𝗵𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗲𝗰𝗵, 𝗯𝘂𝘁 𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗱𝗲𝘀𝗲𝗿𝘃𝗲𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝗯𝗲 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗿𝘂𝗯𝗿𝗶𝗰 𝗼𝗳 𝗳𝗿𝗲𝗲𝗱𝗼𝗺 𝗼𝗳 𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗲𝗰𝗵.” 𝗝𝘂𝗱𝗴𝗲 𝗘𝗱𝘄𝗶𝗻 𝗠𝗼𝗹𝗮𝗵𝗹𝗲𝗵𝗶 – 𝗘𝗾𝘂𝗮𝗹𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗖𝗼𝘂𝗿𝘁, 𝗦𝗼𝘂𝘁𝗵 𝗔𝗳𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗮

“𝖲𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋. 𝖪𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖥𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋.” 𝖠 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀 𝖼𝗁𝖺𝗇𝗍𝖾𝖽 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝖼𝖾𝗅𝖾𝖻𝗋𝖺𝗍𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗀𝗋𝖾𝖾𝗇𝗅𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗐𝖾𝗋𝖾 𝗀𝗂𝗏𝖾𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗆𝗈𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗃𝗎𝖽𝗀𝖾𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗐𝖺𝗌 𝗁𝖺𝗇𝖽𝖾𝖽 𝖽𝗈𝗐𝗇 𝖻𝗒 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖤𝗊𝗎𝖺𝗅𝗂𝗍𝗒 𝖢𝗈𝗎𝗋𝗍. 𝖠 𝗃𝗎𝖽𝗀𝖾𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝖽𝖾𝖼𝗂𝖽𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀 “𝖽𝖾𝗌𝖾𝗋𝗏𝖾𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝖻𝖾 𝗉𝗋𝗈𝗍𝖾𝖼𝗍𝖾𝖽 𝗎𝗇𝖽𝖾𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗋𝗎𝖻𝗋𝗂𝖼 𝗈𝖿 𝖿𝗋𝖾𝖾𝖽𝗈𝗆 𝗈𝖿 𝗌𝗉𝖾𝖾𝖼𝗁.” 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝗃𝗈𝗒𝖿𝗎𝗅 𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗉𝖺𝗌𝗌𝗂𝗈𝗇𝖺𝗍𝖾 𝖾𝗑𝗉𝗋𝖾𝗌𝗌𝗂𝗈𝗇𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗅𝗒𝗋𝗂𝖼𝗌 𝗐𝖾𝗋𝖾 𝗅𝗈𝗎𝖽, 𝖼𝗅𝖾𝖺𝗋 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗂𝗇𝗍𝖾𝗇𝗍𝗂𝗈𝗇𝖺𝗅. 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖾𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗂𝗈𝗇𝗌 𝖽𝗂𝗌𝗉𝗅𝖺𝗒𝖾𝖽 𝖽𝗎𝗋𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗁𝖺𝗇𝗍𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 “𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋 𝗂𝗌 𝖺 𝖼𝗈𝗐𝖺𝗋𝖽, 𝗌𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋,” 𝗐𝖺𝗌 𝗇𝗈𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗅𝖾𝗌𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗇 𝗆𝗈𝗇𝗌𝗍𝗋𝗈𝗎𝗌 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝖺 𝖽𝖾𝗆𝗈𝗇𝗂𝖼 𝗀𝗅𝗂𝗌𝗍𝖾𝗇 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖾𝗒𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝗈𝗌𝖾 𝗓𝖾𝖺𝗅𝗈𝗎𝗌𝗅𝗒 𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗅𝗒𝗋𝗂𝖼𝗌, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗉𝖺𝗌𝗌𝗂𝗈𝗇𝖺𝗍𝖾𝗅𝗒 𝖽𝗂𝗌𝗉𝗅𝖺𝗒𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗍𝗋𝖾𝖽 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋. 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗈𝗎𝗋𝗍 𝗌𝖺𝗒𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗂𝗍 𝗂𝗌 𝗇𝗈𝗍 𝖺𝗇 𝗂𝗇𝖼𝗂𝗍𝖾𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝗄𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗈𝗋 𝖼𝖺𝗎𝗌𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝖺𝗋𝗆. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖼𝖺𝗅𝗅 𝗂𝗍 𝗇𝗈𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗆𝗈𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗇 𝖺 𝗌𝗍𝗋𝗎𝗀𝗀𝗅𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀. 𝖠 𝗍𝗋𝖺𝖽𝗂𝗍𝗂𝗈𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝖿𝗈𝗅𝗅𝗈𝗐𝖾𝖽 𝖺 𝗈𝗇𝖼𝖾 𝗍𝖾𝗋𝗋𝗈𝗋𝗂𝗌𝗍 𝗈𝗋𝗀𝖺𝗇𝗂𝗓𝖺𝗍𝗂𝗈𝗇 𝗂𝗇𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗇𝗈𝗐 𝗋𝗎𝗅𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖠𝖭𝖢 𝗀𝗈𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗇𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍. 𝖨𝗍’𝗌 𝗇𝗈𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗆𝗈𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗇 𝖺 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀.

𝖡𝖺𝖼𝗄 𝗁𝗈𝗆𝖾 𝗈𝗇 𝖺 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆, 𝖺 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒 𝗂𝗌 𝗈𝗇𝖼𝖾 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗌𝗁𝖺𝗄𝖾𝗇 𝖻𝗒 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖺𝖻𝗁𝗈𝗋𝗋𝖾𝗇𝖼𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗇𝖾𝗌𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖾𝗒𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗌𝖾 𝖾𝗑𝖾𝖼𝗎𝗍𝗂𝗈𝗇𝖾𝗋𝗌. 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗈𝗎𝗋𝗍 𝗉𝗋𝖾𝗍𝖾𝗇𝖽𝗌 𝗇𝗈𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝗌𝖾𝖾 𝗐𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋 𝗌𝖾𝖾𝗌. 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗈𝗎𝗋𝗍 𝗄𝗇𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝗂𝗍 𝗂𝗌 𝗂𝗇𝖼𝗂𝗍𝖾𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗄𝗇𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝗍𝗂𝗆𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗌𝖾 𝗅𝗒𝗋𝗂𝖼𝗌 𝖾𝗑𝗉𝗅𝗈𝖽𝖾, 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗉𝖾𝗋𝖿𝗈𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋𝗌 𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝗋𝗂𝗅𝖾𝖽 𝗎𝗉 𝖻𝗒 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗌𝖾 𝗐𝗈𝗋𝖽𝗌, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗅𝖺𝗎𝗇𝖼𝗁𝖾𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝗂𝗇𝗍𝗈 𝖺𝖼𝗍𝗂𝗈𝗇. 𝖭𝗈𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖼𝖺𝗇 𝗌𝗍𝗈𝗉 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝗄𝗂𝗅𝗅𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋. 𝖠𝖿𝗍𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗅𝗅, 𝖺 𝖼𝗈𝗎𝗋𝗍 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝗆𝖺𝖽𝖾 𝗂𝗍 𝖼𝗅𝖾𝖺𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 “𝖲𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋. 𝖪𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖥𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋.” 𝗌𝗁𝗈𝗎𝗅𝖽 𝖻𝖾 𝗉𝗋𝗈𝗍𝖾𝖼𝗍𝖾𝖽.

𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋 𝗂𝗌 𝗌𝗍𝗎𝗇𝗇𝖾𝖽 𝖻𝗒 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖻𝗅𝖺𝗍𝖺𝗇𝗍 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖻𝗋𝖺𝗓𝖾𝗇 𝗁𝖺𝗍𝗋𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗈𝗐𝖺𝗋𝖽𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒. 𝖧𝖾 𝖺𝗅𝗋𝖾𝖺𝖽𝗒 𝗅𝗂𝗏𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖽𝖺𝗒𝗌 𝖺𝗇𝗑𝗂𝗈𝗎𝗌𝗅𝗒 𝖺𝗐𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗌 𝖺 𝗍𝖺𝗋𝗀𝖾𝗍, 𝖻𝗎𝗍 𝗈𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝖽𝖺𝗒, 𝖺𝖿𝗍𝖾𝗋 𝖺 𝗃𝗎𝖽𝗀𝖾𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗐𝖺𝗌 𝗁𝖺𝗇𝖽𝖾𝖽 𝖽𝗈𝗐𝗇 𝗂𝗇 𝖿𝖺𝗏𝗈𝗋 𝗈𝖿 𝖺 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀 𝖽𝖾𝗆𝖺𝗇𝖽𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖽𝖾𝖺𝗍𝗁, 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖿𝖾𝖺𝗋 𝗀𝗋𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝖾 𝖻𝖾𝖼𝗈𝗆𝖾𝗌 𝗂𝗇𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗅𝗒 𝗎𝗇𝗇𝖾𝗋𝗏𝖾𝖽. 𝖡𝖾𝖿𝗈𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗎𝗇 𝗂𝗌 𝖺𝖻𝗅𝖾 𝗍𝗈 𝖼𝗈𝗆𝗉𝗅𝖾𝗍𝖾𝗅𝗒 𝖽𝗂𝗌𝖺𝗉𝗉𝖾𝖺𝗋 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗇𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍, 𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝗀𝖺𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋𝖾𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗆𝖺𝖽𝖾 𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗒 𝖾𝖿𝖿𝗈𝗋𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗍𝖾 𝖺 𝖼𝗈𝖼𝗈𝗈𝗇 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗁𝗈𝗆𝖾, 𝖿𝗋𝖺𝗇𝗍𝗂𝖼 𝗍𝗈 𝗄𝖾𝖾𝗉 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝗌𝖺𝖿𝖾. 𝖧𝖾 𝖼𝗁𝖾𝖼𝗄𝗌 𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗒 𝖽𝗈𝗈𝗋𝗄𝗇𝗈𝖻, 𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗒 𝗐𝗂𝗇𝖽𝗈𝗐 𝗅𝖺𝗍𝖼𝗁, 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝖼𝖺𝗆𝖾𝗋𝖺, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗒 𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗅𝖾 𝗏𝗎𝗅𝗇𝖾𝗋𝖺𝖻𝗂𝗅𝗂𝗍𝗒 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗁𝗈𝗆𝖾 𝗆𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍 𝗁𝖺𝗏𝖾. 𝖧𝖾 𝗐𝖺𝗍𝖼𝗁𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗀𝗎𝖺𝗋𝖽 𝖽𝗈𝗀𝗌 𝖺𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗉𝖺𝗍𝗋𝗈𝗅. 𝖧𝖾 𝗄𝖾𝖾𝗉𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒 𝖼𝗅𝗈𝗌𝖾, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗒 𝗌𝗈𝗎𝗇𝖽, 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝗌𝗁𝖺𝖽𝗈𝗐, 𝖺𝗇𝗒 𝗏𝗈𝗂𝖼𝖾 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖽𝗂𝗌𝗍𝖺𝗇𝖼𝖾, 𝖺𝗌 𝗆𝗎𝖼𝗁 𝖺𝗌 𝖺 𝗀𝗋𝗈𝖺𝗇 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝗈𝗇𝖾 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖽𝗈𝗀𝗌, 𝗈𝗋 𝖺 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗆𝗉𝖾𝗋 𝗈𝖿 𝖺 𝗌𝗅𝖾𝖾𝗉𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖼𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖽, 𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗌 𝖺𝗐𝖺𝗄𝖾 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖺𝗅𝖾𝗋𝗍. 𝖧𝖾 𝖼𝗁𝖾𝖼𝗄𝗌 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝖽𝗈𝗈𝗋 𝗂𝗌 𝗌𝗁𝗎𝗍, 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝗐𝗂𝗇𝖽𝗈𝗐 𝗅𝖺𝗍𝖼𝗁 𝗂𝗌 𝗌𝖾𝖼𝗎𝗋𝖾𝖽, 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝖼𝖺𝗆𝖾𝗋𝖺 𝗂𝗌 𝗋𝗎𝗇𝗇𝗂𝗇𝗀, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝗀𝗎𝖺𝗋𝖽 𝖽𝗈𝗀 𝗂𝗌 𝗌𝗍𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝖿𝗈𝖼𝗎𝗌𝖾𝖽.

𝖧𝖾 𝗅𝖺𝗒𝗌 𝗂𝗇 𝖻𝖾𝖽 𝗌𝗍𝖺𝗋𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝖾𝗂𝗅𝗂𝗇𝗀, 𝗎𝗇𝖺𝖻𝗅𝖾 𝗍𝗈 𝗌𝗁𝖺𝗄𝖾 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗋𝖾𝗌𝗍𝗅𝖾𝗌𝗌𝗇𝖾𝗌𝗌 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝗋𝖾𝗉𝗅𝖺𝗒𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗐𝗈𝗋𝖽𝗌, “𝖲𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋, 𝖪𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖥𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋.” 𝖧𝖾 𝖼𝖺𝗇’𝗍 𝖿𝗈𝗋𝗀𝖾𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗆𝖺𝗀𝖾 𝗈𝖿 𝖺 𝖼𝗋𝗈𝗐𝖽 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗎𝗇𝖽𝗋𝖾𝖽𝗌 𝗋𝖾𝗉𝖾𝖺𝗍𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗐𝗈𝗋𝖽𝗌, 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝗉𝗎𝗋𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗍𝗋𝖾𝖽 𝗌𝗉𝗂𝗅𝗅𝗌 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗆𝗈𝗎𝗍𝗁𝗌 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖾𝗒𝖾𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗄𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝖺𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗆𝗎𝗋𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋𝗌 𝗅𝗂𝗄𝖾 𝗁𝗂𝗆, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗆𝗂𝗇𝖽 𝖿𝗅𝖺𝗌𝗁𝖾𝗌 𝖻𝖺𝖼𝗄 𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗋𝖾𝖼𝖾𝗇𝗍𝗅𝗒 𝖺𝖽𝖽𝖾𝖽 𝖼𝗋𝗈𝗌𝗌𝖾𝗌 𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖶𝗁𝗂𝗍𝖾 𝖢𝗋𝗈𝗌𝗌 𝖬𝗈𝗇𝗎𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍. 𝖠 𝗌𝗁𝗂𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝗋𝗎𝗇𝗌 𝖽𝗈𝗐𝗇 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗌𝗉𝗂𝗇𝖾 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗁𝖾 𝗋𝖾𝖼𝖺𝗅𝗅𝗌 𝗌𝗈𝗆𝖾 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗇𝖺𝗆𝖾𝗌, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗆𝖺𝗀𝗂𝗇𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗇𝖺𝗆𝖾, 𝗁𝖾 𝗊𝗎𝗂𝖼𝗄𝗅𝗒 𝖽𝗂𝗌𝖼𝖺𝗋𝖽𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝗈𝗎𝗀𝗁𝗍, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖽𝗈𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖻𝖾𝗌𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝗋𝗂𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗆𝗌𝖾𝗅𝖿 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗈𝗇𝖼𝖾𝗉𝗍. 𝖧𝖾 𝗉𝗋𝖺𝗒𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗂𝗍 𝗂𝗌 𝗇𝗈𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇, 𝗈𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒’𝗌. 𝖶𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝗂𝗇𝖺𝗅𝗅𝗒 𝖿𝖺𝗅𝗅𝗌 𝖺𝗌𝗅𝖾𝖾𝗉, 𝗂𝗍’𝗌 𝖻𝗎𝗍 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝖺 𝗌𝗁𝗈𝗋𝗍 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾. 𝖧𝖾 𝖺𝗐𝖺𝗄𝖾𝗇𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝖼𝗈𝗇𝖿𝗎𝗌𝗂𝗈𝗇, 𝗇𝗈𝗂𝗌𝖾, 𝗉𝖺𝗇𝗂𝖼 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖻𝗅𝗈𝗈𝖽-𝖼𝗎𝗋𝖽𝗅𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗌𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝗀𝗅𝖺𝗇𝖼𝖾𝗌 𝖺𝗋𝗈𝗎𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗆, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗌𝖾𝖾𝗌 𝖿𝖺𝖼𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝗌𝖾𝖾𝗇 𝖻𝖾𝖿𝗈𝗋𝖾, 𝖻𝗎𝗍 𝗋𝖾𝖼𝗈𝗀𝗇𝗂𝗓𝖾𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗍𝗋𝖾𝖽 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖾𝗒𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗐𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝖻𝖾𝖼𝗈𝗆𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖽𝖾𝗆𝗈𝗇𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗇𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍. 𝖧𝖾 𝗂𝗌 𝖺𝗍 𝗈𝗇𝖼𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗂𝖺𝗋 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝗎𝗇𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝖻𝖾𝖼𝗈𝗆𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖺𝗅𝗅 𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝖺𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗄 𝗈𝖿 𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗐𝗈𝗋𝖽𝗌, “𝖲𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋, 𝖪𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖥𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋.” 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝖻𝖾 𝗉𝗋𝗈𝗍𝖾𝖼𝗍𝖾𝖽. 𝖧𝖾 𝗐𝗈𝗇𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗌 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝖺 𝗆𝗈𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗂𝖿 𝖩𝗎𝖽𝗀𝖾 𝖤𝖽𝗐𝗂𝗇 𝖬𝗈𝗅𝖺𝗁𝗅𝖾𝗁𝗂 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗄 𝖽𝗂𝖿𝖿𝖾𝗋𝖾𝗇𝗍𝗅𝗒 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗆𝗈𝗋𝗇𝗂𝗇𝗀, 𝗈𝗋 𝗂𝖿 𝗁𝖾’𝖽 𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗇 𝗁𝖾𝖺𝗋 𝖺𝖻𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗐𝖾𝗋𝖾 𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖺𝖼𝗄𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗇𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍 𝖻𝖾𝖿𝗈𝗋𝖾? 𝖤𝗏𝖾𝗇 𝗂𝖿 𝗁𝖾 𝖽𝗂𝖽, 𝗂𝗍 𝗐𝗈𝗎𝗅𝖽 𝖻𝖾 𝗍𝗈𝗈 𝗅𝖺𝗍𝖾. 𝖧𝖾 𝗆𝖺𝗇𝖺𝗀𝖾𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝗀𝖾𝗍 𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖻𝖾𝖽 𝖻𝖾𝖿𝗈𝗋𝖾 𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗌 𝖻𝖾𝖺𝗍𝖾𝗇 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝖺 𝗐𝖾𝖺𝗉𝗈𝗇 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖺𝖼𝗄𝖾𝖽 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝖺 𝗆𝖺𝖼𝗁𝖾𝗍𝖾. 𝖶𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗅𝗅𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗀𝗋𝗈𝗎𝗇𝖽, 𝖺𝗇 𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖺𝖼𝗄𝖾𝗋 𝗂𝗌 𝗋𝖾𝖺𝖽𝗒 𝗍𝗈 𝖻𝗈𝗋𝖾 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗄𝗇𝖾𝖾𝗌 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝖺𝗇 𝖾𝗅𝖾𝖼𝗍𝗋𝗂𝖼 𝖽𝗋𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗈 𝗄𝖾𝖾𝗉 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝖿𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖻𝖺𝖼𝗄 𝗈𝗋 𝖾𝗌𝖼𝖺𝗉𝗂𝗇𝗀. 𝖧𝖾 𝗄𝗇𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖺𝗋𝖾𝗇’𝗍 𝗋𝖾𝖺𝖽𝗒 𝗍𝗈 𝗄𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗒𝖾𝗍, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝖾 𝗄𝗇𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝖺𝖻𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝗌𝗅𝖺𝗎𝗀𝗁𝗍𝖾𝗋 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖾𝗇𝗍𝗂𝗋𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒 𝖻𝖾𝖿𝗈𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖽𝗈 𝗁𝗂𝗆. 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝗇𝖾𝖾𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗍𝗈 𝗐𝖺𝗍𝖼𝗁 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖽𝖾𝗆𝗈𝗋𝖺𝗅𝗂𝗓𝗂𝗇𝗀, 𝗌𝗈𝗎𝗅-𝖼𝗋𝗎𝗌𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗈𝗋𝗍𝗎𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝖺𝖻𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝗂𝗇𝖿𝗅𝗂𝖼𝗍 𝗈𝗇 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗁𝖺𝗏𝖾 𝖺𝗇 𝗎𝗇𝖿𝖺𝗍𝗁𝗈𝗆𝖺𝖻𝗅𝖾 𝖽𝖾𝗌𝗂𝗋𝖾 𝗍𝗈 𝗌𝖾𝖾 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗌𝗎𝖿𝖿𝖾𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝗋𝗈𝗎𝗀𝗁 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖻𝖺𝗋𝖻𝖺𝗋𝗂𝖼 𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖺𝖼𝗄 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗂𝗌 𝖺𝖻𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝖻𝖾𝗀𝗂𝗇. 𝖥𝗈𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗇𝖾𝗑𝗍 𝖿𝖾𝗐 𝗁𝗈𝗎𝗋𝗌, 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝖻𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗄 𝗁𝗂𝗆, 𝗌𝗁𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖾𝗋 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗁𝖾𝖺𝗋𝗍 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗆𝗎𝗋𝖽𝖾𝗋 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗌𝗅𝗈𝗐𝗅𝗒 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗅𝖺𝗒𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖺 𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗅𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗈𝗇 𝗁𝗂𝗆. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗂𝗇𝖽𝗎𝗅𝗀𝖾 𝗂𝗇 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗉𝖺𝗂𝗇, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖽𝗎𝗋𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗀𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗍 𝗌𝖺𝖽𝗇𝖾𝗌𝗌, 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗌𝗍𝗋𝗂𝗉 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗉𝗈𝗐𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗌 𝖺 𝗁𝗎𝗌𝖻𝖺𝗇𝖽, 𝖿𝖺𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗌𝗈𝗇.

𝖧𝖾 𝗀𝗅𝖺𝗇𝖼𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗐𝗂𝖿𝖾 𝗐𝗁𝗈 𝗍𝗋𝗂𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗈 𝖾𝗌𝖼𝖺𝗉𝖾 𝖻𝗎𝗍 𝗐𝖺𝗌 𝖿𝗅𝗎𝗇𝗀 𝖻𝖺𝖼𝗄 𝗈𝗇𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖻𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗁𝖺𝖽 𝖻𝖾𝖾𝗇 𝗌𝗁𝖺𝗋𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗉𝖺𝗌𝗍 15 𝗒𝖾𝖺𝗋𝗌. 𝖳𝗁𝖾 𝖻𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗌𝗉𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗆𝖺𝗇𝗒 𝗇𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍𝗌 𝗅𝗒𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖺𝗐𝖺𝗄𝖾, 𝗉𝗅𝖺𝗇𝗇𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖽𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌, 𝖽𝗂𝗌𝖼𝗎𝗌𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖼𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖽𝗋𝖾𝗇, 𝗉𝗋𝖾𝗉𝖺𝗋𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝖿𝖺𝗆𝗂𝗅𝗒 𝗏𝗂𝗌𝗂𝗍𝗌, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗉𝖾𝗋𝗁𝖺𝗉𝗌, 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗋𝖾𝗍𝗂𝗋𝖾𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗌𝗈𝗆𝖾𝖽𝖺𝗒. 𝖨𝗍 𝗐𝖺𝗌 𝖺 𝗌𝖺𝖿𝖾 𝗉𝗅𝖺𝖼𝖾; 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗌𝖺𝗇𝖼𝗍𝗎𝖺𝗋𝗒 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗂𝗍 𝗐𝖺𝗌 𝗂𝗇𝗍𝗂𝗆𝖺𝗍𝖾𝗅𝗒 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝗌𝖾𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖻𝖾𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗁𝖾𝗅𝖽 𝖽𝗈𝗐𝗇, 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗌𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌 𝖿𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖺𝗂𝗋. 𝖨𝗇 𝖺 𝖼𝗈𝗋𝗇𝖾𝗋, 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖾𝗅𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗅𝗒 𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗂𝗌 𝗍𝗋𝗒𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖻𝖾𝗌𝗍 𝗍𝗈 𝗌𝗁𝗂𝖾𝗅𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗅𝗂𝗍𝗍𝗅𝖾 𝖻𝗈𝗒 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖺𝗅𝗆𝗈𝗌𝗍 𝗍𝖾𝖾𝗇 𝖽𝖺𝗎𝗀𝗁𝗍𝖾𝗋 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗇𝖾𝗌𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖻𝗋𝗎𝗍𝖺𝗅𝗂𝗍𝗒 𝗂𝗇𝖿𝗅𝗂𝖼𝗍𝖾𝖽 𝗎𝗉𝗈𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗍𝖺𝗄𝖾 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇𝗌 𝖺𝗌 𝗁𝖾 𝗋𝖾𝗅𝗎𝖼𝗍𝖺𝗇𝗍𝗅𝗒 𝗐𝖺𝗍𝖼𝗁𝖾𝗌, 𝗌𝗍𝗋𝗎𝗀𝗀𝗅𝖾𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝖿𝗋𝖾𝖾 𝗁𝗂𝗆𝗌𝖾𝗅𝖿, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖻𝖾𝗀𝗀𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗅𝗂𝖿𝖾 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗅𝗂𝗏𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖼𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖽𝗋𝖾𝗇. 𝖶𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖻𝖾𝖺𝗎𝗍𝗂𝖿𝗎𝗅 𝗐𝗂𝖿𝖾, 𝗐𝗁𝗈 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝗌𝗉𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗒𝖾𝖺𝗋𝗌 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗈𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗌𝗈 𝗅𝗈𝗏𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗅𝗒 𝖼𝗎𝗅𝗍𝗂𝗏𝖺𝗍𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗈 𝖿𝖾𝖾𝖽 𝖺 𝖼𝗈𝗎𝗇𝗍𝗋𝗒, 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝖼𝗁 𝗂𝗇𝖼𝗅𝗎𝖽𝖾𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖺𝖼𝗄𝖾𝗋𝗌, 𝗀𝗈𝖾𝗌 𝗌𝗂𝗅𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗅𝗂𝗆𝗉, 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗁𝖾𝖺𝗋𝗍 𝗂𝗌 𝗌𝗁𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖾𝗋𝖾𝖽 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖲𝗉𝗂𝗋𝗂𝗍 𝖼𝗋𝗎𝗌𝗁𝖾𝖽. 𝖧𝖾 𝖼𝗋𝗂𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗁𝖾𝗋, 𝖻𝗎𝗍 𝗌𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝖺𝗇 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝖺𝗇𝗌𝗐𝖾𝗋 𝗁𝗂𝗆, 𝗈𝗋 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇 𝗍𝗈 𝗅𝗈𝗈𝗄 𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗆. 𝖧𝖾 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗁𝗈𝗅𝖽 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇𝗌𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗉𝗋𝗈𝗆𝗂𝗌𝖾 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗒𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝖻𝖾 𝖺𝗅𝗋𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍. 𝖧𝖾 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗌𝗍𝗋𝗈𝗄𝖾 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖼𝗁𝖾𝖾𝗄, 𝗌𝗆𝖾𝗅𝗅 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗁𝖺𝗂𝗋, 𝗈𝗋 𝖿𝖾𝖾𝗅 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖼𝗎𝖽𝖽𝗅𝖾 𝗎𝗉 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇𝗌𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇 𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗅𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍𝗌. 𝖲𝗁𝖾 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗁𝗎𝗆 𝗌𝗈𝖿𝗍𝗅𝗒 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗄𝗂𝗍𝖼𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝗉𝗋𝖾𝗉𝖺𝗋𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖽𝗂𝗇𝗇𝖾𝗋 𝗈𝗋 𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗍𝗈𝗉 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗏𝗈𝗂𝖼𝖾 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝗍𝖺𝗄𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖽𝖺𝗂𝗅𝗒 𝗌𝗁𝗈𝗐𝖾𝗋. 𝖩𝗎𝗌𝗍 𝗅𝗂𝗄𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍, 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗅𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍 𝗁𝖺𝖽 𝗀𝗈𝗇𝖾 𝗈𝗎𝗍.

𝖫𝗂𝗄𝖾 𝖺𝗇𝗂𝗆𝖺𝗅𝗌 𝗐𝗁𝗈 𝗁𝖺𝗏𝖾 𝗍𝖺𝗌𝗍𝖾𝖽 𝖻𝗅𝗈𝗈𝖽 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝗂𝗋𝗌𝗍 𝗍𝗂𝗆𝖾, 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗍𝖾𝖺𝗋 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗆𝗈𝗆 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖽𝗋𝖾𝗇 𝗐𝗁𝗈 𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝗁𝗒𝗌𝗍𝖾𝗋𝗂𝖼𝖺𝗅𝗅𝗒 𝖻𝖾𝗀𝗀𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗍𝖾-𝖿𝗂𝗅𝗅𝖾𝖽 𝗂𝗇𝗍𝗋𝗎𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝗉𝗅𝖾𝖺𝗌𝖾 𝗇𝗈𝗍 𝗁𝗎𝗋𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗀𝗋𝖺𝗇𝗇𝗒. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖽𝗈𝗇’𝗍 𝗒𝖾𝗍 𝗊𝗎𝗂𝗍𝖾 𝖼𝗈𝗆𝗉𝗋𝖾𝗁𝖾𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗆𝗈𝗆𝗆𝗒 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗇𝗎𝗋𝗌𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖺𝗋𝖾 𝗂𝗅𝗅, 𝗁𝖾𝗅𝗉 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗁𝗈𝗆𝖾𝗐𝗈𝗋𝗄, 𝗈𝗋 𝗉𝗅𝖺𝗇𝗍 𝖺 𝗊𝗎𝗂𝖼𝗄 𝗄𝗂𝗌𝗌 𝗈𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖿𝗈𝗋𝖾𝗁𝖾𝖺𝖽. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝖽𝗈𝗇’𝗍 𝗒𝖾𝗍 𝗎𝗇𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗌𝗍𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗂𝗍 𝗐𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝖻𝖾 𝗇𝖾𝖼𝖾𝗌𝗌𝖺𝗋𝗒 𝗍𝗈 𝖽𝗈 𝖺𝗇𝗒 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝗈𝗌𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗌. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗉𝗅𝖾𝖺𝖽 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖻𝖾𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖿𝖺𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗍𝗈 𝗁𝖾𝗅𝗉 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗀𝗋𝖺𝗇𝖽𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋, 𝗍𝗈 𝗌𝖺𝗏𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝗉𝖾𝗈𝗉𝗅𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗇𝖾𝗏𝖾𝗋 𝗁𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝖽 𝖺 𝗌𝗂𝗇𝗀𝗅𝖾 𝖽𝖺𝗒 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗅𝗂𝗏𝖾𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝗁𝖾𝖺𝗋𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖼𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖽𝗋𝖾𝗇, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖾𝖺𝗋𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗆𝗈𝖺𝗇𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋. 𝖬𝖾𝗋𝖼𝗂𝖿𝗎𝗅𝗅𝗒, 𝗂𝗍 𝖽𝗂𝖽𝗇’𝗍 𝗍𝖺𝗄𝖾 𝗆𝗎𝖼𝗁 𝗍𝗈 𝖾𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝖾𝗋, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁𝗂𝗇 𝗆𝗂𝗇𝗎𝗍𝖾𝗌 𝗂𝗍 𝗐𝖺𝗌 𝗈𝗏𝖾𝗋.

𝖧𝗂𝗌 14-𝗒𝖾𝖺𝗋-𝗈𝗅𝖽 𝖽𝖺𝗎𝗀𝗁𝗍𝖾𝗋, 𝖺𝗇 𝖺𝗍𝗁𝗅𝖾𝗍𝖾 𝖺𝗍 𝗌𝖼𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗅, 𝗌𝗆𝖺𝗋𝗍, 𝗄𝗂𝗇𝖽, 𝖼𝗈𝗆𝗉𝖺𝗌𝗌𝗂𝗈𝗇𝖺𝗍𝖾, 𝖺 𝖽𝖾𝗏𝗈𝗍𝖾𝖽 𝗌𝗂𝗌𝗍𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖿𝗋𝗂𝖾𝗇𝖽 𝗐𝗂𝗍𝗁 𝖽𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝖻𝖾𝖼𝗈𝗆𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗐𝗈𝗇𝖽𝖾𝗋𝖿𝗎𝗅 𝗌𝗈𝗆𝖾𝖽𝖺𝗒 𝗂𝗌 𝗌𝗎𝖽𝖽𝖾𝗇𝗅𝗒 𝖻𝖾𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗋𝗂𝗉𝗉𝖾𝖽 𝖺𝗉𝖺𝗋𝗍 𝖻𝗒 𝖾𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍 𝖺𝗋𝗆𝗌, 𝖾𝖺𝖼𝗁 𝖼𝗅𝖺𝗐𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖾𝗋, 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝗂𝗇𝖿𝗅𝗂𝖼𝗍𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖺 𝗍𝗈𝗋𝗍𝗎𝗋𝖾 𝗌𝗈 𝗂𝗇𝗁𝗎𝗆𝖺𝗇𝖾, 𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝖺𝗇 𝖻𝖺𝗋𝖾𝗅𝗒 𝗍𝖺𝗄𝖾 𝗂𝗍 𝗂𝗇. 𝖧𝖾 𝗌𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗌𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝖻𝗌 𝖺𝗌 𝗌𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝖻𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝗉𝗅𝖾𝖺𝖽𝗌 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝗅𝗂𝖿𝖾. 𝖧𝖾 𝖻𝖾𝗀𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝖺𝗄𝖾 𝗁𝗂𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝖽𝗈𝖾𝗌𝗇’𝗍 𝗎𝗇𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗌𝗍𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗍𝖾? 𝖧𝖾 𝖽𝗈𝖾𝗌𝗇’𝗍 𝗎𝗇𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗌𝗍𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗐𝗁𝗒 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝖼𝗈𝗆𝖾? 𝖧𝖾 𝖻𝖾𝗀𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝖾𝗅𝗅 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗐𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖾 𝖽𝗂𝖽? 𝖶𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗐𝗂𝖿𝖾 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗆𝗈𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖽𝗂𝖽 𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆? 𝖧𝖾 𝗐𝖺𝗇𝗍𝗌 𝗍𝗈 𝗇𝖾𝗀𝗈𝗍𝗂𝖺𝗍𝖾 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗅𝗂𝗏𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖼𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖽𝗋𝖾𝗇, 𝖻𝗎𝗍 𝗁𝖾 𝖽𝗈𝖾𝗌𝗇’𝗍 𝗄𝗇𝗈𝗐 𝗐𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗐𝖺𝗇𝗍? 𝖨𝗍’𝗌 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗈𝗇𝖾 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗆 𝗐𝖺𝗅𝗄𝗌 𝗎𝗉 𝗍𝗈 𝗁𝗂𝗆, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝖾𝗅𝗅𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗌 𝖺 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗍𝖾 𝗉𝗂𝗀, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖼𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖽𝗋𝖾𝗇 𝗌𝗁𝗈𝗎𝗅𝖽 𝖻𝖾 𝗎𝗌𝖾𝖽 𝗈𝗇𝗅𝗒 𝖺𝗌 𝖿𝖾𝗋𝗍𝗂𝗅𝗂𝗓𝖾𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗁𝖾 𝗈𝗇𝖼𝖾 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗁𝖾𝖺𝗋𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀, “𝖲𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋, 𝖪𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖥𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋.” 𝖨𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗆𝗈𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍, 𝗁𝖾 𝗄𝗇𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝗁𝖾 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝗅𝗈𝗌𝗍. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗁𝖺𝗏𝖾 𝖺𝗅𝗅 𝗅𝗈𝗌𝗍. 𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇 𝗁𝖺𝗌 𝖼𝗈𝗆𝖾, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖺𝗌 𝗁𝖾 𝗐𝖺𝗍𝖼𝗁𝖾𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗅𝖺𝗌𝗍 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗋𝗎𝖾𝗅𝗍𝗒 𝖻𝖾𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝖼𝖺𝗋𝗋𝗂𝖾𝖽 𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗈𝗇 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖽𝖺𝗎𝗀𝗁𝗍𝖾𝗋, 𝗁𝖾 𝗋𝖾𝗌𝗂𝗀𝗇𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗆𝗌𝖾𝗅𝖿 𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝖼𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖺𝗍 𝗂𝗍 𝗂𝗌 𝖺𝗅𝗆𝗈𝗌𝗍 𝗈𝗏𝖾𝗋. 𝖧𝖾 𝗄𝗇𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗅𝗂𝗍𝗍𝗅𝖾 𝖻𝗈𝗒 𝗂𝗌 𝗇𝖾𝗑𝗍, 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋𝖾 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗋𝖾 𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗌 𝖻𝖾𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗁𝖾𝗅𝖽 𝖼𝖺𝗉𝗍𝗂𝗏𝖾 𝗂𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗈𝗋𝗇𝖾𝗋 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖻𝖾𝖽𝗋𝗈𝗈𝗆. 𝖧𝖾 𝖻𝗈𝗐𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗁𝖾𝖺𝖽, 𝗎𝗇𝖺𝖻𝗅𝖾 𝗍𝗈 𝗅𝗈𝗈𝗄 𝗈𝗇𝖾 𝗅𝖺𝗌𝗍 𝗍𝗂𝗆𝖾 𝗂𝗇𝗍𝗈 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖾𝗒𝖾𝗌 𝗈𝖿 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝗇 𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗈 𝖺𝖽𝗈𝗋𝖾𝗌. 𝖧𝖾 𝖼𝗅𝗈𝗌𝖾𝗌 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝖾𝗒𝖾𝗌, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗉𝗋𝖺𝗒𝗌 𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗅𝗈𝗎𝖽, 𝗂𝗇𝗍𝖾𝗇𝗍 𝗈𝗇 𝗌𝗂𝗅𝖾𝗇𝖼𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗀𝗋𝗈𝖺𝗇𝗌, 𝗌𝖼𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗆𝗌 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗐𝗁𝗂𝗆𝗉𝖾𝗋𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗈𝖿 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗈𝗇𝗅𝗒 𝗌𝗈𝗇. 𝖧𝖾 𝗉𝗋𝖺𝗒𝗌 𝗅𝗈𝗎𝖽𝖾𝗋 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗅𝗈𝗎𝖽𝖾𝗋, 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗒 𝗍𝗋𝗒 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗌𝗁𝗎𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗎𝗉, 𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝖺𝗅𝗅𝗌 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗆𝖾𝗋𝖼𝗒 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝖻𝖾𝗀𝗌 𝖿𝗈𝗋 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗍𝗎𝗋𝗇.

𝖶𝗁𝗂𝗅𝖾 𝗁𝖾 𝗅𝖺𝗒𝗌 𝗌𝖼𝖺𝗇𝗇𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖻𝖾𝖽𝗋𝗈𝗈𝗆 𝖺𝖿𝗍𝖾𝗋 𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗂𝗋 𝖺𝗍𝗍𝖺𝖼𝗄𝖾𝗋𝗌 𝗁𝖺𝗏𝖾 𝗅𝖾𝖿𝗍, 𝗁𝖾 𝗂𝗌 𝗆𝗈𝗆𝖾𝗇𝗍𝗌 𝖺𝗐𝖺𝗒 𝖿𝗋𝗈𝗆 𝗅𝖾𝗍𝗍𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗈𝗎𝗍 𝗁𝗂𝗌 𝗅𝖺𝗌𝗍 𝖻𝗋𝖾𝖺𝗍𝗁. 𝖠𝗌 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗋𝗈𝗈𝗆 𝖺𝗋𝗈𝗎𝗇𝖽 𝗁𝗂𝗆 𝗀𝗈𝖾𝗌 𝖽𝖺𝗋𝗄, 𝗁𝖾 𝖺𝗀𝖺𝗂𝗇 𝗐𝗈𝗇𝖽𝖾𝗋𝗌 𝗐𝗁𝖾𝗍𝗁𝖾𝗋 𝖩𝗎𝖽𝗀𝖾 𝖤𝖽𝗐𝗂𝗇 𝖬𝗈𝗅𝖺𝗁𝗅𝖾𝗁𝗂 𝗆𝗂𝗀𝗁𝗍 𝖿𝗂𝗇𝖺𝗅𝗅𝗒 𝗌𝖾𝖾 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖼𝗈𝗇𝗇𝖾𝖼𝗍𝗂𝗈𝗇 𝖻𝖾𝗍𝗐𝖾𝖾𝗇 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝗌𝗈𝗇𝗀, “𝖲𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋, 𝖪𝗂𝗅𝗅 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖥𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋” 𝖺𝗇𝖽 𝗌𝗁𝗈𝗈𝗍𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖡𝗈𝖾𝗋, 𝗄𝗂𝗅𝗅𝗂𝗇𝗀 𝗍𝗁𝖾 𝖿𝖺𝗋𝗆𝖾𝗋.

© 𝗔𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗲 𝗩𝗟 2022

#boerlivesmatter #southafrica #myturnsouthafrica #waragainstboers #afrikanerdiscrimination #waragainstafrikaners #southafricanfarmers #southafricanmurders

Please navigate to the next page for more …