The Cemetery No-One Talks About

Picture by Lita Fourie

If you meet a South African Farmer, a Boer, or an Afrikaner, you wouldn’t know that a White Cross Monument was erected bearing thousands of white crosses, each holding the name of a cold-blooded, ruthless, and targeted murder. You wouldn’t know the stories they keep, or the brutality each cross raised represents. Most of all, you wouldn’t know how it grows each day, or how many stories will still be kept hidden behind those names. You wouldn’t know much heartache, fear, and sadism they represent, because this tribe no longer relies on justice, impartiality, or protection from a country whose flag is drenched in the blood of these men and women. They no longer mourn over the blood spilt on these lands, instead, they cover the spillage with soil, shake it off with barely any time to grieve, pick up the pieces, plaster a smile on their faces, pull their family together and pray to survive another day. Another sunrise, and another sunset. They no longer cry out for help because there is none. They no longer tell their stories because no-one wants to hear them. They know that the world is at the mercy of the media, the wealthy and the powerful, and they don’t fit into a narrative that guarantees the eradication of their values, morals, and beliefs.

You wouldn’t know about the White Cross Monument, the cemetery no-one talks about, because the same government presiding over these farmers, are secret enforcers of these murders. We all know. Every South African citizen knows, but it remains a perfect denial. The White Cross Monument is a wound, a reminder to the puppet-masters that farmers must be suppressed and stifled. It is the story of unwarranted retaliation and unjustified revenge against the Boer and Afrikaner for land that was stolen, the slaves taken and murdered, and the annihilation of black tribes across the country. The problem with this narrative is, it isn’t real. It is a propagandized lie conjured up to incite hatred against a Christian, and culturally distinct community. It is a ploy to capture, torture and murder one of the smallest nations in the world, because of the color of their skin, and because of their cultural differences.

No matter what you believe, or who you listen to, these murders cannot be disputed. The racial discrimination against this tribe cannot be ignored or invalidated. The anti-white employment laws cannot be contested. The absence of recognizing this reality has led to an unnerving, yet comfortable delusion for all who wish to remain uninvolved.

Each white cross holds a name of a father, mother, brother, sister, daughter, son, or grandparent. Each name bears witness to a gruesome, horrific killing that came in and destroyed a family who was simply trying to survive. Each body bag carried out of a home, a place that was supposed to be safe, tells a story of a torturous night that had played out for hours before God mercifully reached down, nursed their brokenness, and freed them from their nightmare. A grandmother who was raped over and over again, just so that a grandfather or a son could watch as pure evil attempted to conquer what belonged to God. A mother listening to the cries of her children being burnt, boiled, or strangled, who had to watch her attackers finish her off, leaving her only moments away from death. A father and grandfather kept alive, but crippled to prevent them from defending their families, just so that they could endure the scenes of torment in their homes.

War is ugly and its everywhere, but war is swift. The killings are quick. The enemy goes down swiftly. The war waged against the Boer and Afrikaner nations are cruel, prolonged, and evil. These deaths follow hours of sadistic torment, hatred, cruelty, and barbarism. Cruelty that is intentional and enacted by emotionally indifferent beings. A tribe of attackers with role models such as, but not limited to Idi Amin, Fidel Castro, and Robert Mugabe. Power structures and methods of control is applied through violence and fear, and results in an environment overcome with stress when these men and women, fathers and mothers are unable to provide for, or protect their children. These killings have become rituals to a tribe that performs sacrificial rituals to ancestral spirits, relies on genitalia of white children for their voodoo and potions. When it’s all over, when the voices have become silent and the bodies lay lifeless at their feet, the attackers have one final act of desecration. To urinate on already maimed bodies and find pleasure in the brutality inflicted upon them only moments before.

These crosses are testament to an immorality that for no other reason other than the color of their skin, and cultural differences, ended lives in a way too horrific to grasp. There are often no words to describe the violence inflicted upon babies or the aged. It almost seems like an exaggeration when we are looked at in disbelief. We question the repugnance at times when we hear our distorted and sorrow-filled voices describe the horrific scenes that a family had to endure before they were able to let out a final breath. But it’s when we talk about law enforcement, or the military equipped with military-grade weapons that are implicated in these attacks, that we understand the doubt in someone else’s eyes. It’s when we begin whispering that political parties with a number of seats in parliament are the orchestrators of these murders, that we know others question our integrity. When our president publicly displays contempt for our nation that we realize our punishment for crimes we haven’t committed isn’t over yet. When cabinet ministers openly threaten or condemn us for their failures, we know that through their hostility, they approve of these murders, making way for lawlessness and a hunger for our blood.

This is the price a God-fearing nation is paying for a world that turns away and settles on an illusion it’s comfortable with. A world where some believe it to be retribution for the propaganda of stolen land and oppression. A world that’s okay with raping, murdering, and using any weapon possible, from power tools to automatic rifles, to snuff out these lives. A world quick to condemn wars between conflicting countries, even though the lives lost are far less than the casualties between tribes in South Africa.

How is anyone okay with that?

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